Child Support

In Georgia, both parents are obligated to provide for the support of a child until the child reaches the age of 18, or graduates from high school, whichever is later, but no later than age 20.

 

Most people facing the prospect of a divorce with children involved wonder

How am I going to support my children?
How am I going to pay for my child’s medical expenses?
How am I going to pay for my child’s education?

Call or Email KF Law to help you get the financial support your children need and deserve.

 

In Georgia, both parents are obligated to provide for the support of a child until the child reaches the age of 18, or graduates from high school, whichever is later, but no later than age 20. There is no obligation to support a child in college or post graduate studies. However, we generally recommend trying to get an agreement concerning college expenses; if the parties agree to in settlement negotiations, and include in the Final Decree of Divorce, will be enforced by the courts as if it were law.

The total monthly income of the two parents is applied to the schedule of the basic child support obligation table. You can see the table, as well as the Child Support Worksheet, by clicking here: Child Support Calculator.

The share of this obligation for each parent is determined by prorating the number on this table according to the percentage of each parent’s income to the total income.

Application of these guidelines creates a presumption that the amount of child support is correct. However, courts may use their discretion to award a child support different from that determined by the Child Support Calculator.

In such case, the court must make specific findings on the record that there is sufficient reason to vary from these guidelines.

 

Factors for Adjustment of the Child Support Guidelines

Some of the statutory factors which the court may consider in making a determination to adjust the guidelines are:

Mandatory Adjustments:

  • Pre-existing child support orders for other children
  • The cost of health insurance and work-related child care
  • Self- employment taxes
  • Social security benefits paid for children

Discretionary Adjustments:

  • Parenting time exercised by the non-custodial parent
  • Extraordinary medical costs
  • Extraordinary Educational costs
  • One party’s other support obligations to another household
  • Income that should be imputed to a party because of suppression of income
  • In-kind income for the self-employed, such as reimbursed meals or a company car
  • Other support a party is providing or will be providing, such as payment of a mortgage
  • A party’s own extraordinary needs, such as medical expenses
  • In-kind contribution of either parent
  • Extraordinary travel expenses to exercise visitation or shared physical custody

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